Targeted reading comprehension strategies instruction for raising reading levels in tertiary contexts

  • Natalie Savery Unitec Institute of Technology
Keywords: reading comprehension, reading strategies, literacy, LLN, literacies embedding, targeted literacy strategies instruction, adult learners, tertiary contexts, adult reading education.

Abstract

This small-scale action research within a tertiary music bridging programme with language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) embedded examined the effect of reading comprehension strategies instruction for raising adult reading levels. In particular, this study investigated the efficacy of targeted reading strategies instruction on improving the components of reading underpinning comprehension and critical reading of text. A cyclical model of action research methodology involving typical reconnaissance, implementation and evaluation phases was conducted, employing multiple mixed methods of data collection including reading testing and surveys. The results showed slight reading gains within the small student sample, and evidence of improvements across the targeted components of reading. These results suggested that targeted reading comprehension strategies instruction may be a valid approach for raising adult learner reading levels in tertiary contexts. However, further research with a larger sample size and in different disciplines is required. The action research process enabled the development and refinement of a reading pedagogical model that provides a framework for educators embedding literacies in foundation or mainstream tertiary programmes.

Author Biography

Natalie Savery, Unitec Institute of Technology
Academic Literacies Advisor to the Faculty of Social and Health Sciences
Published
2012-02-13
How to Cite
Savery, N. (2012). Targeted reading comprehension strategies instruction for raising reading levels in tertiary contexts. Journal of Academic Language and Learning, 6(1), A32-A47. Retrieved from https://journal.aall.org.au/index.php/jall/article/view/181
Section
Research Articles