A report on a pilot English language intervention model for undergraduate trainee nurses

  • Neil Murray Research Centre for Languages and Cultures University of South Australia
Keywords: English for Nursing & Midwifery, English language proficiency pilot, English language professional accreditation requirements, constraints governing English language provision

Abstract

English-medium universities are enrolling increasing numbers of students for whom English is not a first language. Despite having met English language entry criteria, these individuals can still have difficulty coping with degree programme content due to inadequate English language skills, and this presents receiving institutions with the challenge of how best to provide support to ensure this cohort can fully realise its academic potential. The stakes are particularly high for students who need to demonstrate specified levels of language proficiency in order to meet professional accreditation boards’ registration criteria. This is the case for students in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of South Australia, the context of the current study. This article reports on a pilot intervention model that constituted part of an English language strategy currently being formulated at the University. The model comprised 39 hours of face-to-face tuition in which language was taught within contexts relevant to trainee and practising nurses. Results suggest that even a quite modest language intervention can have an impact on students’ English language competence.

Author Biography

Neil Murray, Research Centre for Languages and Cultures University of South Australia
Neil Murray is Senior Lecturer in Applied Linguistics and Senior Consultant English Language Proficiency at the University of South Australia. He holds degrees in TESOL and Applied Linguistics from the universities of Cambridge and London as well as Temple University Japan. He has published numerous articles in applied linguistics as well as books on academic listening and writing for McGraw-Hill and Pearson Longman, and his current interests include pedagogical pragmatics, intercultural competence, and the development of academic writing skills. He is currently heading the University of South Australia's English Language Proficiency Project.
Published
2012-02-25
How to Cite
Murray, N. (2012). A report on a pilot English language intervention model for undergraduate trainee nurses. Journal of Academic Language and Learning, 6(1), A48-A63. Retrieved from https://journal.aall.org.au/index.php/jall/article/view/135
Section
Research Articles